Quality Data

UMC is dedicated to continually assess and improve our quality of patient care. We do this by monitoring many safety indicators. Below are just a few of the indicators we monitor as part of our quality program. We encourage you to ask your health care team if you have any questions or concerns about your care at UMC.

Percentage of patients receiving appropriate recommendations for follow-up screening colonoscopy.

Percentage of patients receiving appropriate recommendations for follow-up screening colonoscopy. 

Percentage of patients with history of polyps receiving follow-up colonoscopy in the appropriate timeframe.

Percentage of patients with history of polyps receiving follow-up colonoscopy in the appropriate timeframe.

A colonoscopy is one test that is used to find precancerous abnormal growths (polyps) or colorectal cancer. Most polyps can be removed before they turn into cancer, effectively preventing colon cancer from developing, therefore it is important to follow your doctor’s recommendation for follow up colonoscopies. At UMC we have processes in place to remind patients of the need for follow up testing based on best practice guidelines. Our patients with appropriate follow-ups are better than the state and national averages.

Patients who developed a blood clot while in the hospital who did not get treatment that could have prevented it.

Patients who developed a blood clot while in the hospital who did not get treatment that could have prevented it.

Hospital patients who must stay in bed for long periods of time are at a higher risk of developing blood clots in the legs. Blood clots can cause pain, swelling and redness of the leg and can break off and travel to other parts of the body and cause more serious complications.

At UMC, we have processes in place to evaluate patients at risk and use items like compression socks or medication to prevent clots from occurring. The number of patients at UMC who did not get treatment and developed a clot is better than both the state and the national average.

Outpatient CT scans of the abdomen that were combination (double) scans. If a number is high, it may mean that too many patients have a double scan when a single scan is all they need.

Outpatient CT scans of the abdomen that were combination (double) scans.

Outpatients who got cardiac imaging stress tests before low-risk outpatient surgery (If a number is high, it may mean that too many cardiac scans were done prior to low-risk surgeries.)

Outpatients who got cardiac imaging stress tests before low-risk outpatient surgery

A CT scan combines a series of x-ray images taken from different angles around your body to create a picture of the bones, blood vessels and soft tissues inside your body and provides more information than a plan x-ray.

A cardiac stress test uses images to measure the blood flow to the heart both at rest and during stress.

These imaging tests do use low dose radiation and UMC strives to reduce the risk of unnecessary testing and radiation exposure to our patients. We use processes to screen for medical necessity before each test in order to limit exposure.