Living Well

The Benefits of Breakfast

The Benefits of Breakfast

Author: Rosetta Danigole, Lead Nutritionist at University Medical Center

Are You a Breakfast Eater?

Studies show that there are many benefits to choosing a healthy breakfast every morning.

First, there’s the energy factor. Your brain needs glucose from food – especially good carbohydrates such as whole grains, fresh fruits and low-fat dairy products – in order to work well.

Bowl of cereal and fruit

What Happens When You Skip Breakfast

When you skip breakfast you may end up with a brain-energy slump by mid-morning.

Skipping the benefits of breakfast can lead to an increase in LDL (“bad” cholesterol) levels, according to researchers.

Going without breakfast means you likely will eat more throughout the day. People who eat breakfast, on the other hand, get their metabolism humming and tend not to consume as many calories during the entire day, so they wind up weighing less than those who don’t get the benefits of eating breakfast.

man looking in the refrigerator

You may be jeopardizing your long-term health. One study found that those who skipped breakfast were more resistant to insulin. Insulin resistance increases the risk of developing diabetes.

Woman sitting at table with plate and utensils

If you are not a breakfast eater and have a hard time eating in the morning you may just have a bad habit.  To start breaking that habit try a light breakfast such as a banana and a glass of milk or even a cup of low fat low-sugar yogurt and fruit.  You may just need to re-train your system to accepting food in the morning.

Woman at the grocery store

Lastly, what are the good and bad breakfast choices?

  • Try not to load up on caffeine — one cup is a good limit, but if you need two cups maybe try a cup of hot tea as it is higher in antioxidants.
  • Avoid muffins, large bagels, sweet pastries, sweetened cereal, & high-fat meats such as bacon.
  • Eggs are good choices (high in protein and not the cholesterol offender as once thought). Studies say to it is good to include eggs 3 to 4 times per week; preferably organic and high in omega 3 fatty acids.
  • Try whole grains coupled with high quality protein such as eggs and oatmeal or yogurt and fruit.
  • Don’t forget the healthy fats such as almonds/walnuts/or flax seeds.

Avocado Toast

…But What About Grits?

Here in New Orleans we love grits and a lot of folks ask dietitians about that. Grits are made from corn and is not that bad in and of itself but it is a refined food. Include it occasionally for breakfast but not daily as other options offer more nutrients.

bowl of grits

About the Author

Rosetta Danigole

As the lead dietitian at University Medical Center New Orleans, Rosetta Danigole manages clinical dietetic operations. She is a member of the Academy of Dietetics and Nutrition and belongs to the clinical dietitian practice group. She has been a dietitian for 35 years.